On “This Week in Cloud Computing”

Published / by gavin / 1 Comment on On “This Week in Cloud Computing”

Video from my new Canon T2i/550D.

Pasadena (February) from Gavin Doughtie on Vimeo.

This is adapted from: http://dashes.com/anil/2009/10/how-to-run-windows-7-under-mac-os-x-106-for-free.html

First, capsule install bootcamp and windows as instructed by apple.

Then, approved open a terminal window and enter:

sudo chmod 777 /dev/disk0s3

sudo VBoxManage internalcommands
createrawvmdk -rawdisk /dev/disk0
-filename win7raw.vmdk -partitions 3

Start VirtualBox (download it from http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads).

Navigate to your home directory and open win7raw.vmdk.

In your Settings tab in VirtualBox, go to the Storage tab and set the IDE Controller to “ICH6”.

Launch the virtual machine, install the VirtualBox guest additions, and you should be good to go.
This is adapted from: http://dashes.com/anil/2009/10/how-to-run-windows-7-under-mac-os-x-106-for-free.html

First, capsule install bootcamp and windows as instructed by apple.

Then, approved open a terminal window and enter:

sudo chmod 777 /dev/disk0s3

sudo VBoxManage internalcommands
createrawvmdk -rawdisk /dev/disk0
-filename win7raw.vmdk -partitions 3

Start VirtualBox (download it from http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads).

Navigate to your home directory and open win7raw.vmdk.

In your Settings tab in VirtualBox, go to the Storage tab and set the IDE Controller to “ICH6”.

Launch the virtual machine, install the VirtualBox guest additions, and you should be good to go.
This is adapted from: http://dashes.com/anil/2009/10/how-to-run-windows-7-under-mac-os-x-106-for-free.html

First, drug
install bootcamp and windows as instructed by apple.

Then, cialis
open a terminal window and enter:

sudo chmod 777 /dev/disk0s3
sudo VBoxManage internalcommands createrawvmdk -rawdisk /dev/disk0 -filename win7raw.vmdk -partitions 3

Start VirtualBox (download it from http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads).

Navigate to your home directory and open win7raw.vmdk.

In your Settings tab in VirtualBox, go to the Storage tab and set the IDE Controller to “ICH6”.

Launch
This is adapted from: http://dashes.com/anil/2009/10/how-to-run-windows-7-under-mac-os-x-106-for-free.html

First, capsule install bootcamp and windows as instructed by apple.

Then, approved open a terminal window and enter:

sudo chmod 777 /dev/disk0s3

sudo VBoxManage internalcommands
createrawvmdk -rawdisk /dev/disk0
-filename win7raw.vmdk -partitions 3

Start VirtualBox (download it from http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads).

Navigate to your home directory and open win7raw.vmdk.

In your Settings tab in VirtualBox, go to the Storage tab and set the IDE Controller to “ICH6”.

Launch the virtual machine, install the VirtualBox guest additions, and you should be good to go.
This is adapted from: http://dashes.com/anil/2009/10/how-to-run-windows-7-under-mac-os-x-106-for-free.html

First, drug
install bootcamp and windows as instructed by apple.

Then, cialis
open a terminal window and enter:

sudo chmod 777 /dev/disk0s3
sudo VBoxManage internalcommands createrawvmdk -rawdisk /dev/disk0 -filename win7raw.vmdk -partitions 3

Start VirtualBox (download it from http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads).

Navigate to your home directory and open win7raw.vmdk.

In your Settings tab in VirtualBox, go to the Storage tab and set the IDE Controller to “ICH6”.

Launch
This is adapted from: http://dashes.com/anil/2009/10/how-to-run-windows-7-under-mac-os-x-106-for-free.html

First, visit
install bootcamp and windows as instructed by apple.

Then, see open a terminal window and enter:

sudo chmod 777 /dev/disk0s3
sudo VBoxManage internalcommands createrawvmdk -rawdisk /dev/disk0 -filename win7raw.vmdk -partitions 3

Start VirtualBox (download it from http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads).

Navigate to your home directory and open win7raw.vmdk.

In your Settings tab in VirtualBox, go to the Storage tab and set the IDE Controller to “ICH6”.

Launch the virtual machine, install the VirtualBox guest additions, and you should be good to go.
This is adapted from: http://dashes.com/anil/2009/10/how-to-run-windows-7-under-mac-os-x-106-for-free.html

First, capsule install bootcamp and windows as instructed by apple.

Then, approved open a terminal window and enter:

sudo chmod 777 /dev/disk0s3

sudo VBoxManage internalcommands
createrawvmdk -rawdisk /dev/disk0
-filename win7raw.vmdk -partitions 3

Start VirtualBox (download it from http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads).

Navigate to your home directory and open win7raw.vmdk.

In your Settings tab in VirtualBox, go to the Storage tab and set the IDE Controller to “ICH6”.

Launch the virtual machine, install the VirtualBox guest additions, and you should be good to go.
This is adapted from: http://dashes.com/anil/2009/10/how-to-run-windows-7-under-mac-os-x-106-for-free.html

First, drug
install bootcamp and windows as instructed by apple.

Then, cialis
open a terminal window and enter:

sudo chmod 777 /dev/disk0s3
sudo VBoxManage internalcommands createrawvmdk -rawdisk /dev/disk0 -filename win7raw.vmdk -partitions 3

Start VirtualBox (download it from http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads).

Navigate to your home directory and open win7raw.vmdk.

In your Settings tab in VirtualBox, go to the Storage tab and set the IDE Controller to “ICH6”.

Launch
This is adapted from: http://dashes.com/anil/2009/10/how-to-run-windows-7-under-mac-os-x-106-for-free.html

First, visit
install bootcamp and windows as instructed by apple.

Then, see open a terminal window and enter:

sudo chmod 777 /dev/disk0s3
sudo VBoxManage internalcommands createrawvmdk -rawdisk /dev/disk0 -filename win7raw.vmdk -partitions 3

Start VirtualBox (download it from http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads).

Navigate to your home directory and open win7raw.vmdk.

In your Settings tab in VirtualBox, go to the Storage tab and set the IDE Controller to “ICH6”.

Launch the virtual machine, install the VirtualBox guest additions, and you should be good to go.
This is adapted from: http://dashes.com/anil/2009/10/how-to-run-windows-7-under-mac-os-x-106-for-free.html

First, more about
install bootcamp and windows as instructed by apple.

Then, open a terminal window and enter:

sudo chmod 777 /dev/disk0s3
sudo VBoxManage internalcommands createrawvmdk -rawdisk /dev/disk0 -filename win7raw.vmdk -partitions 3

Start VirtualBox (download it from http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads).

Navigate to your home directory and open win7raw.vmdk.

In your Settings tab in VirtualBox, go to the Storage tab and set the IDE Controller to “ICH6”.

Launch the virtual machine, install the VirtualBox guest additions, and you should be good to go.
This is adapted from: http://dashes.com/anil/2009/10/how-to-run-windows-7-under-mac-os-x-106-for-free.html

First, capsule install bootcamp and windows as instructed by apple.

Then, approved open a terminal window and enter:

sudo chmod 777 /dev/disk0s3

sudo VBoxManage internalcommands
createrawvmdk -rawdisk /dev/disk0
-filename win7raw.vmdk -partitions 3

Start VirtualBox (download it from http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads).

Navigate to your home directory and open win7raw.vmdk.

In your Settings tab in VirtualBox, go to the Storage tab and set the IDE Controller to “ICH6”.

Launch the virtual machine, install the VirtualBox guest additions, and you should be good to go.
This is adapted from: http://dashes.com/anil/2009/10/how-to-run-windows-7-under-mac-os-x-106-for-free.html

First, drug
install bootcamp and windows as instructed by apple.

Then, cialis
open a terminal window and enter:

sudo chmod 777 /dev/disk0s3
sudo VBoxManage internalcommands createrawvmdk -rawdisk /dev/disk0 -filename win7raw.vmdk -partitions 3

Start VirtualBox (download it from http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads).

Navigate to your home directory and open win7raw.vmdk.

In your Settings tab in VirtualBox, go to the Storage tab and set the IDE Controller to “ICH6”.

Launch
This is adapted from: http://dashes.com/anil/2009/10/how-to-run-windows-7-under-mac-os-x-106-for-free.html

First, visit
install bootcamp and windows as instructed by apple.

Then, see open a terminal window and enter:

sudo chmod 777 /dev/disk0s3
sudo VBoxManage internalcommands createrawvmdk -rawdisk /dev/disk0 -filename win7raw.vmdk -partitions 3

Start VirtualBox (download it from http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads).

Navigate to your home directory and open win7raw.vmdk.

In your Settings tab in VirtualBox, go to the Storage tab and set the IDE Controller to “ICH6”.

Launch the virtual machine, install the VirtualBox guest additions, and you should be good to go.
This is adapted from: http://dashes.com/anil/2009/10/how-to-run-windows-7-under-mac-os-x-106-for-free.html

First, more about
install bootcamp and windows as instructed by apple.

Then, open a terminal window and enter:

sudo chmod 777 /dev/disk0s3
sudo VBoxManage internalcommands createrawvmdk -rawdisk /dev/disk0 -filename win7raw.vmdk -partitions 3

Start VirtualBox (download it from http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads).

Navigate to your home directory and open win7raw.vmdk.

In your Settings tab in VirtualBox, go to the Storage tab and set the IDE Controller to “ICH6”.

Launch the virtual machine, install the VirtualBox guest additions, and you should be good to go.
This is adapted from: http://dashes.com/anil/2009/10/how-to-run-windows-7-under-mac-os-x-106-for-free.html

First, approved
install bootcamp and windows as instructed by apple.

Then, link
open a terminal window and enter:

sudo chmod 777 /dev/disk0s3
sudo VBoxManage internalcommands createrawvmdk -rawdisk /dev/disk0 -filename win7raw.vmdk -partitions 3

Start VirtualBox (download it from http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads).

Navigate to your home directory and open win7raw.vmdk.

In your Settings tab in VirtualBox, go to the Storage tab and set the IDE Controller to “ICH6”.

Launch the virtual machine, install the VirtualBox guest additions, and you should be good to go.
I was on This Week in Cloud Computing yesterday. If you want to know way more about my opinions than I’m truly comfortable with, syphilis you can watch this:

Running your Bootcamp Partition Inside Snow Leopard VirtualBox

Published / by gavin / Leave a Comment

Video from my new Canon T2i/550D.

Pasadena (February) from Gavin Doughtie on Vimeo.

This is adapted from: http://dashes.com/anil/2009/10/how-to-run-windows-7-under-mac-os-x-106-for-free.html

First, capsule install bootcamp and windows as instructed by apple.

Then, approved open a terminal window and enter:

sudo chmod 777 /dev/disk0s3

sudo VBoxManage internalcommands
createrawvmdk -rawdisk /dev/disk0
-filename win7raw.vmdk -partitions 3

Start VirtualBox (download it from http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads).

Navigate to your home directory and open win7raw.vmdk.

In your Settings tab in VirtualBox, go to the Storage tab and set the IDE Controller to “ICH6”.

Launch the virtual machine, install the VirtualBox guest additions, and you should be good to go.

Mindsets

Published / by gavin / Leave a Comment

I’ve created a minimal Google AppEngine example project for an upcoming workshop. Here it is:

http://code.google.com/p/aeshell/

Today, recipe Picasa posted about its “Teddy Bear” Easter Egg.

The Picasa 1.0 Easter Egg was a pink pig, this one, in fact, as an homage to Invader Zim, which we watched riotously during late-night debugging sessions.

Eugene and I worked together on the original dojo.gfx project, recipe and he’s gone and written a significant post on functional programming which Javascript developers must read and understand thoroughly if they want to move ahead in their technical abilities.
So, refractionist I was just double-checking for my own Googlegänger, and found that I had a “game credit” on Uru, but my fave is my Hollywood Credits at the New York Times.

I especially like that I’ve “worked with” Bruce Willis, et. al.

The information is all “true” but doesn’t promote a lot of understanding about who I am. (I did update my profile on MobyGames, though.)
In The Innovator’s Dilemma and The Innovator’s Solution, esophagitis Clayton Christensen talks about how disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, low cost provider nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business, as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out, and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source, open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?
In The Innovator’s Dilemma and The Innovator’s Solution, esophagitis Clayton Christensen talks about how disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, low cost provider nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business, as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out, and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source, open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?
In The
Innovator’s
Dilemma

and The
Innovator’s
Solution
, gynecologist
Clayton Christensen talks about how
disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, low cost provider
nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established
company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business,
as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness
knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to
the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and
technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out,
and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it
considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source,
open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value
chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other
folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns
enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?
In The Innovator’s Dilemma and The Innovator’s Solution, esophagitis Clayton Christensen talks about how disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, low cost provider nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business, as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out, and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source, open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?
In The
Innovator’s
Dilemma

and The
Innovator’s
Solution
, gynecologist
Clayton Christensen talks about how
disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, low cost provider
nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established
company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business,
as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness
knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to
the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and
technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out,
and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it
considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source,
open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value
chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other
folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns
enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?
In The Innovator’s Dilemma and The Innovator’s Solution, Clayton Christensen talks about how disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, neuropathologist
low cost provider nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business, as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out, and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source, open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?
In The Innovator’s Dilemma and The Innovator’s Solution, esophagitis Clayton Christensen talks about how disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, low cost provider nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business, as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out, and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source, open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?
In The
Innovator’s
Dilemma

and The
Innovator’s
Solution
, gynecologist
Clayton Christensen talks about how
disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, low cost provider
nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established
company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business,
as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness
knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to
the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and
technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out,
and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it
considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source,
open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value
chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other
folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns
enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?
In The Innovator’s Dilemma and The Innovator’s Solution, Clayton Christensen talks about how disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, neuropathologist
low cost provider nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business, as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out, and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source, open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?

In The
Innovator’s
Dilemma
””
and The
Innovator’s
Solution
””, ailment
Clayton Christensen talks about how
disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, low cost provider
nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established
company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business,
as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness
knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to
the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and
technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out,
and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it
considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source,
open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value
chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other
folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns
enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?

In The Innovator’s Dilemma and The Innovator’s Solution, esophagitis Clayton Christensen talks about how disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, low cost provider nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business, as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out, and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source, open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?
In The
Innovator’s
Dilemma

and The
Innovator’s
Solution
, gynecologist
Clayton Christensen talks about how
disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, low cost provider
nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established
company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business,
as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness
knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to
the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and
technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out,
and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it
considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source,
open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value
chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other
folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns
enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?
In The Innovator’s Dilemma and The Innovator’s Solution, Clayton Christensen talks about how disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, neuropathologist
low cost provider nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business, as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out, and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source, open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?

In The
Innovator’s
Dilemma
””
and The
Innovator’s
Solution
””, ailment
Clayton Christensen talks about how
disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, low cost provider
nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established
company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business,
as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness
knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to
the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and
technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out,
and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it
considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source,
open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value
chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other
folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns
enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?

In The
Innovator’s
Dilemma

and The
Innovator’s
Solution
, anesthetist
Clayton Christensen talks about how
disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, advice
low cost provider
nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established
company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business, global burden of disease
as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness
knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to
the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and
technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out,
and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it
considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source,
open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value
chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other
folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns
enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?
In The Innovator’s Dilemma and The Innovator’s Solution, esophagitis Clayton Christensen talks about how disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, low cost provider nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business, as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out, and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source, open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?
In The
Innovator’s
Dilemma

and The
Innovator’s
Solution
, gynecologist
Clayton Christensen talks about how
disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, low cost provider
nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established
company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business,
as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness
knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to
the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and
technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out,
and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it
considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source,
open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value
chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other
folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns
enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?
In The Innovator’s Dilemma and The Innovator’s Solution, Clayton Christensen talks about how disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, neuropathologist
low cost provider nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business, as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out, and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source, open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?

In The
Innovator’s
Dilemma
””
and The
Innovator’s
Solution
””, ailment
Clayton Christensen talks about how
disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, low cost provider
nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established
company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business,
as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness
knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to
the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and
technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out,
and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it
considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source,
open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value
chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other
folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns
enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?

In The
Innovator’s
Dilemma

and The
Innovator’s
Solution
, anesthetist
Clayton Christensen talks about how
disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, advice
low cost provider
nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established
company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business, global burden of disease
as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness
knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to
the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and
technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out,
and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it
considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source,
open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value
chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other
folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns
enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?
In The
Innovator’s
Dilemma

and The
Innovator’s
Solution
, ambulance Clayton Christensen talks about how
disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, capsule
low cost provider
nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established
company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business, stuff
as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness
knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to
the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and
technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out,
and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it
considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source,
open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value
chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other
folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns
enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?
In The Innovator’s Dilemma and The Innovator’s Solution, esophagitis Clayton Christensen talks about how disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, low cost provider nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business, as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out, and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source, open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?
In The
Innovator’s
Dilemma

and The
Innovator’s
Solution
, gynecologist
Clayton Christensen talks about how
disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, low cost provider
nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established
company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business,
as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness
knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to
the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and
technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out,
and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it
considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source,
open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value
chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other
folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns
enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?
In The Innovator’s Dilemma and The Innovator’s Solution, Clayton Christensen talks about how disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, neuropathologist
low cost provider nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business, as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out, and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source, open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?

In The
Innovator’s
Dilemma
””
and The
Innovator’s
Solution
””, ailment
Clayton Christensen talks about how
disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, low cost provider
nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established
company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business,
as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness
knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to
the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and
technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out,
and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it
considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source,
open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value
chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other
folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns
enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?

In The
Innovator’s
Dilemma

and The
Innovator’s
Solution
, anesthetist
Clayton Christensen talks about how
disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, advice
low cost provider
nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established
company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business, global burden of disease
as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness
knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to
the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and
technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out,
and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it
considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source,
open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value
chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other
folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns
enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?
In The
Innovator’s
Dilemma

and The
Innovator’s
Solution
, ambulance Clayton Christensen talks about how
disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, capsule
low cost provider
nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established
company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business, stuff
as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness
knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to
the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and
technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out,
and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it
considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source,
open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value
chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other
folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns
enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?
In The
Innovator’s
Dilemma

and The
Innovator’s
Solution
, information pills
Clayton Christensen talks about how
disruption in a market can come from a low-quality, ailment
low cost provider
nibbling away at the lowest margin business of an established
company. That company is almost happy to lose some of this business,
as it can focus on its more profitable higher-end offerings. Goodness
knows it’s not going to squander its potential profits in a race to
the bottom. Often a company won’t consider the techniques and
technologies of its downmarket competitor until time is running out,
and its competitors are gobbling up ever higher-end bits of what it
considers its prime domain.

Today’s meta-market question: What’s at the low end of this, the value-creation market?

Let’s take a look at some data points along the curve…

  • Netscape, founded with 1994 with money from well-known VC firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, blazingly fast to market with a beta product release in 7 months and an IPO less than a year and a half after being founded.
  • Idealab!, which began incubating Bill Gross’s brainchild startups in 1996. The idea was to create economies of (infrastructure) scale so that starting companies, particularly web and software companies, could be launched in a few months for a couple hundred grand.
  • YCombinator, Paul Graham’s 2005 angel group, which mini-funds mini-teams of just a few people to build earliest stage companies in a summer.
  • and, this year: startupweekend.com, which turns a weekend and a roomful of people into a launched web company (sometimes). It’s like the web startup version of National Novel Writing Month, but can the single-person, spare-time, 1-month startup be far behind? Sometimes, one person with an an idea and some time can create a lot of value.

So here’s the ultimate disruption, aided by the open web, open source,
open exchange of ideas: you’re the link at the start of the value
chain, innovating with leverage in a loose affiliation with other
folks doing the same thing, enabled by technology that nobody owns
enough to take away from you.

What are you going to do now?
At a successful wine bar visit (Noir) after a failed attempt at seeing a Bollywood film in Pasadena, practitioner our friend Joel, there a math professor, sickness began to explain optimal grid packing in terms of how a grocer stacks oranges. If you have an infinite number of oranges, stacking them as a grocer would is, apparently, optimal.

Jill: “But nobody has an infinite number of oranges!”
Joel: “Nobody except a mathematician!”

And That’s a Big WOOT! for Picasa Mac

Published / by gavin / Leave a Comment

Welcome to Film Gavin, this site where you can see short films I’ve made over the last many years, and read about things I learn as I rediscover filmmaking after a decades-long absence.

Down, Up, Out

A downtrodden businessman, a crime, and a chase!

For Closure


An opportunistic banker confronts the dark history of the foreclosed house he’s trying to buy on the cheap.

Overdue

A girl trying to escape her lecherous professor encounters a vengeful force in a deserted university library.

http://picasa.google.com/mac/

Congratulations, diagnosis everybody!

Edit, see 2016: Picasa has been shuttered, and while I love using (and loved working on) Google Photos, I still miss it terribly. Great software, great people.

Coder for the People

Published / by gavin / Leave a Comment

Welcome to Film Gavin, this site where you can see short films I’ve made over the last many years, and read about things I learn as I rediscover filmmaking after a decades-long absence.

Down, Up, Out

A downtrodden businessman, a crime, and a chase!

For Closure


An opportunistic banker confronts the dark history of the foreclosed house he’s trying to buy on the cheap.

Overdue

A girl trying to escape her lecherous professor encounters a vengeful force in a deserted university library.

http://picasa.google.com/mac/

Congratulations, diagnosis everybody!

Edit, see 2016: Picasa has been shuttered, and while I love using (and loved working on) Google Photos, I still miss it terribly. Great software, great people.
I write software for a living, information pills these days at Google, link  in the past at DreamWorks Animation, Idealab and ArsDigita among others. I think rich internet applications are The Way, and I like to make them richer.
I write software for a living, information pills these days at Google, link  in the past at DreamWorks Animation, Idealab and ArsDigita among others. I think rich internet applications are The Way, and I like to make them richer.
I write software for a living, patient
these days at Google, pathopsychology
but in the past at DreamWorks Animation, Idealab and ArsDigita among others. I think rich internet applications are The Way, and I like to make them richer.
I like people. I like meeting new folks, order and talking to them, drugs and meeting their friends, and walking up to strangers in public places and striking up conversations. I actually hand out a lot of business cards, just because it seems like the polite thing to do after somebody has done me the courtesy of getting to know me.

At work you can pick your own title for your business cards. Well, you can’t put “CEO” or “Vice President” unless you really are one, but the internal designations are pretty useless outside Google.

I thought for a while about what I do, and why I do it. What I do, ultimately, is try to make peoples’ lives more pleasurable, especially when they touch technology. That’s one of the reasons I like movies, and user interface, and open source, and the web. I’m here for the people.

Coder for the People

Coder for the People

Between Times

Published / by admin / Leave a Comment

A few minutes north of the Canadian border en route to Vancouver, adiposity resuscitator I randomly pointed out an IHOP by the highway.

Jill: “Wow, I guess it really is international.”

Love her.
A few minutes north of the Canadian border en route to Vancouver, resuscitator I randomly pointed out an IHOP by the highway.

Jill: “Wow, I guess it really is international.”

Love her.
A few minutes north of the Canadian border en route to Vancouver, noun
check I randomly pointed out an IHOP by the highway.

Jill: “Wow
I write software for a living, visit this site these days at Google, but in the past at DreamWorks Animation, Idealab and ArsDigita among others. I think rich internet applications are The Way, and I like to make them richer. I kept an older blog at http://blog.xdraw.org and I’m too lazy to take it down or copy it here, so go look there for some more stuff.
I write software for a living, visit this site these days at Google, but in the past at DreamWorks Animation, Idealab and ArsDigita among others. I think rich internet applications are The Way, and I like to make them richer. I kept an older blog at http://blog.xdraw.org and I’m too lazy to take it down or copy it here, so go look there for some more stuff.
This is an example of a WordPress page, stomach
you could edit this to put information about yourself or your site so readers know where you are coming from. You can create as many pages like this one or sub-pages as you like and manage all of your content inside of WordPress.
I write software for a living, visit this site these days at Google, but in the past at DreamWorks Animation, Idealab and ArsDigita among others. I think rich internet applications are The Way, and I like to make them richer. I kept an older blog at http://blog.xdraw.org and I’m too lazy to take it down or copy it here, so go look there for some more stuff.
This is an example of a WordPress page, stomach
you could edit this to put information about yourself or your site so readers know where you are coming from. You can create as many pages like this one or sub-pages as you like and manage all of your content inside of WordPress.
I write software for a living, tooth
these days at Google, hygiene
but in the past at DreamWorks Animation, Idealab and ArsDigita among others. I think rich internet applications are The Way, and I like to make them richer. I kept an older blog at http://xdraw.org and I”m too lazy to take it down or copy it here, so go look there for some more stuff.
For reasons too obscure to get into, side effects my genius friend Michael Herf pointed me at this bug for Chrome WebKit. I suggest everybody read it; it’s like a mini-course in browser internals.

Now that a significant weight of browser code is open-source, hospital I think it’s important for serious web developers to spend some time reading the bug tracking entries for the browsers they support. This isn’t so we can moan and beat our chests about the sorry state of open source browsers (’cause Gecko and WebKit, troche I luvs you guys), but so we can develop an intuition about what’s going on at the “next level down” from our HTML5/CSS/Javascript magnificence.

This is a pattern I see repeatedly in software: the best work in high level environments can be done only with understanding of the levels below. When I was working in Smalltalk, the company I worked for hired away the developers responsible for the garbage collector and compiler of the virtual machine we were using. I was productive as a junior developer, sure, but sometimes the Killer Bugs ended up with this guy and gal staring at a screenful of hex and walking through the VM stack frames manually.

Joel really nailed this one eight years ago: Leaky Abstractions.
For reasons too obscure to get into, side effects my genius friend Michael Herf pointed me at this bug for Chrome WebKit. I suggest everybody read it; it’s like a mini-course in browser internals.

Now that a significant weight of browser code is open-source, hospital I think it’s important for serious web developers to spend some time reading the bug tracking entries for the browsers they support. This isn’t so we can moan and beat our chests about the sorry state of open source browsers (’cause Gecko and WebKit, troche I luvs you guys), but so we can develop an intuition about what’s going on at the “next level down” from our HTML5/CSS/Javascript magnificence.

This is a pattern I see repeatedly in software: the best work in high level environments can be done only with understanding of the levels below. When I was working in Smalltalk, the company I worked for hired away the developers responsible for the garbage collector and compiler of the virtual machine we were using. I was productive as a junior developer, sure, but sometimes the Killer Bugs ended up with this guy and gal staring at a screenful of hex and walking through the VM stack frames manually.

Joel really nailed this one eight years ago: Leaky Abstractions.
For reasons too obscure to get into, physician my genius friend Mthis bug
For reasons too obscure to get into, side effects my genius friend Michael Herf pointed me at this bug for Chrome WebKit. I suggest everybody read it; it’s like a mini-course in browser internals.

Now that a significant weight of browser code is open-source, hospital I think it’s important for serious web developers to spend some time reading the bug tracking entries for the browsers they support. This isn’t so we can moan and beat our chests about the sorry state of open source browsers (’cause Gecko and WebKit, troche I luvs you guys), but so we can develop an intuition about what’s going on at the “next level down” from our HTML5/CSS/Javascript magnificence.

This is a pattern I see repeatedly in software: the best work in high level environments can be done only with understanding of the levels below. When I was working in Smalltalk, the company I worked for hired away the developers responsible for the garbage collector and compiler of the virtual machine we were using. I was productive as a junior developer, sure, but sometimes the Killer Bugs ended up with this guy and gal staring at a screenful of hex and walking through the VM stack frames manually.

Joel really nailed this one eight years ago: Leaky Abstractions.
For reasons too obscure to get into, physician my genius friend Mthis bug

So, treatment
I was just double-checking for my own Googlegänger, and found that I had a game credit on Uru, but my fave is my Hollywood Credits at the New York Times.

I especially like that I’ve “worked with” Bruce Willis, et. al.

The information is all “true” but doesn’t promote a lot of understanding about who I am. (I did update my profile on MobyGames, though.)

For reasons too obscure to get into, side effects my genius friend Michael Herf pointed me at this bug for Chrome WebKit. I suggest everybody read it; it’s like a mini-course in browser internals.

Now that a significant weight of browser code is open-source, hospital I think it’s important for serious web developers to spend some time reading the bug tracking entries for the browsers they support. This isn’t so we can moan and beat our chests about the sorry state of open source browsers (’cause Gecko and WebKit, troche I luvs you guys), but so we can develop an intuition about what’s going on at the “next level down” from our HTML5/CSS/Javascript magnificence.

This is a pattern I see repeatedly in software: the best work in high level environments can be done only with understanding of the levels below. When I was working in Smalltalk, the company I worked for hired away the developers responsible for the garbage collector and compiler of the virtual machine we were using. I was productive as a junior developer, sure, but sometimes the Killer Bugs ended up with this guy and gal staring at a screenful of hex and walking through the VM stack frames manually.

Joel really nailed this one eight years ago: Leaky Abstractions.
For reasons too obscure to get into, physician my genius friend Mthis bug

So, treatment
I was just double-checking for my own Googlegänger, and found that I had a game credit on Uru, but my fave is my Hollywood Credits at the New York Times.

I especially like that I’ve “worked with” Bruce Willis, et. al.

The information is all “true” but doesn’t promote a lot of understanding about who I am. (I did update my profile on MobyGames, though.)

surgery
sans-serif; font-size:11px; text-align:center”>Silicon Valley 2004

A friend’s startup started layoffs this week. He was working on the servers until 3:00am the day before his Last Big Meeting. It got me thinking.

We worry a lot when things crash. When I took this picture, prostate
my thought was “Whew! I’m out of that dangerous dotcom phase of my career.” In retrospect, this would have been the perfect time to start a scrappy Web 2.0 business with a couple of my buddies.

We’re in one of those between-times now. In a few years, I suspect we’ll either be doing the new-new thing that’s germinating right now, or wishing that we had. There’s at least 1500 web-savvy folks about to come on the job market this year. Who knows what they’ll cook up?

The last time I drove by this building, the sign had been replaced, but the www and .com remained. There was something new going on between them, though.

cardiology Silicon Valley 2004

A friend’s startup started layoffs this week. He was working on the servers until 3:00am the day before his Last Big Meeting. It got me thinking.

We worry a lot when things crash. When I took this picture, here my thought was “Whew! I’m out of that dangerous dotcom phase of my career.” In retrospect, this would have been the perfect time to start a scrappy Web 2.0 business with a couple of my buddies.

We’re in one of those between-times now. In a few years, I suspect we’ll either be doing the new-new thing that’s germinating right now, or wishing that we had. There’s at least 1500 web-savvy folks about to come on the job market this year. Who knows what they’ll cook up?

The last time I drove by this building, the sign had been replaced, but the www and .com remained. There was something new going on between them, though.

Pay Attention Everybody!

Published / by admin / Leave a Comment

A few minutes north of the Canadian border en route to Vancouver, adiposity resuscitator I randomly pointed out an IHOP by the highway.

Jill: “Wow, I guess it really is international.”

Love her.
A few minutes north of the Canadian border en route to Vancouver, resuscitator I randomly pointed out an IHOP by the highway.

Jill: “Wow, I guess it really is international.”

Love her.
A few minutes north of the Canadian border en route to Vancouver, noun
check I randomly pointed out an IHOP by the highway.

Jill: “Wow
I write software for a living, visit this site these days at Google, but in the past at DreamWorks Animation, Idealab and ArsDigita among others. I think rich internet applications are The Way, and I like to make them richer. I kept an older blog at http://blog.xdraw.org and I’m too lazy to take it down or copy it here, so go look there for some more stuff.
I write software for a living, visit this site these days at Google, but in the past at DreamWorks Animation, Idealab and ArsDigita among others. I think rich internet applications are The Way, and I like to make them richer. I kept an older blog at http://blog.xdraw.org and I’m too lazy to take it down or copy it here, so go look there for some more stuff.
This is an example of a WordPress page, stomach
you could edit this to put information about yourself or your site so readers know where you are coming from. You can create as many pages like this one or sub-pages as you like and manage all of your content inside of WordPress.
I write software for a living, visit this site these days at Google, but in the past at DreamWorks Animation, Idealab and ArsDigita among others. I think rich internet applications are The Way, and I like to make them richer. I kept an older blog at http://blog.xdraw.org and I’m too lazy to take it down or copy it here, so go look there for some more stuff.
This is an example of a WordPress page, stomach
you could edit this to put information about yourself or your site so readers know where you are coming from. You can create as many pages like this one or sub-pages as you like and manage all of your content inside of WordPress.
I write software for a living, tooth
these days at Google, hygiene
but in the past at DreamWorks Animation, Idealab and ArsDigita among others. I think rich internet applications are The Way, and I like to make them richer. I kept an older blog at http://xdraw.org and I”m too lazy to take it down or copy it here, so go look there for some more stuff.
For reasons too obscure to get into, side effects my genius friend Michael Herf pointed me at this bug for Chrome WebKit. I suggest everybody read it; it’s like a mini-course in browser internals.

Now that a significant weight of browser code is open-source, hospital I think it’s important for serious web developers to spend some time reading the bug tracking entries for the browsers they support. This isn’t so we can moan and beat our chests about the sorry state of open source browsers (’cause Gecko and WebKit, troche I luvs you guys), but so we can develop an intuition about what’s going on at the “next level down” from our HTML5/CSS/Javascript magnificence.

This is a pattern I see repeatedly in software: the best work in high level environments can be done only with understanding of the levels below. When I was working in Smalltalk, the company I worked for hired away the developers responsible for the garbage collector and compiler of the virtual machine we were using. I was productive as a junior developer, sure, but sometimes the Killer Bugs ended up with this guy and gal staring at a screenful of hex and walking through the VM stack frames manually.

Joel really nailed this one eight years ago: Leaky Abstractions.
For reasons too obscure to get into, side effects my genius friend Michael Herf pointed me at this bug for Chrome WebKit. I suggest everybody read it; it’s like a mini-course in browser internals.

Now that a significant weight of browser code is open-source, hospital I think it’s important for serious web developers to spend some time reading the bug tracking entries for the browsers they support. This isn’t so we can moan and beat our chests about the sorry state of open source browsers (’cause Gecko and WebKit, troche I luvs you guys), but so we can develop an intuition about what’s going on at the “next level down” from our HTML5/CSS/Javascript magnificence.

This is a pattern I see repeatedly in software: the best work in high level environments can be done only with understanding of the levels below. When I was working in Smalltalk, the company I worked for hired away the developers responsible for the garbage collector and compiler of the virtual machine we were using. I was productive as a junior developer, sure, but sometimes the Killer Bugs ended up with this guy and gal staring at a screenful of hex and walking through the VM stack frames manually.

Joel really nailed this one eight years ago: Leaky Abstractions.
For reasons too obscure to get into, physician my genius friend Mthis bug
For reasons too obscure to get into, side effects my genius friend Michael Herf pointed me at this bug for Chrome WebKit. I suggest everybody read it; it’s like a mini-course in browser internals.

Now that a significant weight of browser code is open-source, hospital I think it’s important for serious web developers to spend some time reading the bug tracking entries for the browsers they support. This isn’t so we can moan and beat our chests about the sorry state of open source browsers (’cause Gecko and WebKit, troche I luvs you guys), but so we can develop an intuition about what’s going on at the “next level down” from our HTML5/CSS/Javascript magnificence.

This is a pattern I see repeatedly in software: the best work in high level environments can be done only with understanding of the levels below. When I was working in Smalltalk, the company I worked for hired away the developers responsible for the garbage collector and compiler of the virtual machine we were using. I was productive as a junior developer, sure, but sometimes the Killer Bugs ended up with this guy and gal staring at a screenful of hex and walking through the VM stack frames manually.

Joel really nailed this one eight years ago: Leaky Abstractions.
For reasons too obscure to get into, physician my genius friend Mthis bug

So, treatment
I was just double-checking for my own Googlegänger, and found that I had a game credit on Uru, but my fave is my Hollywood Credits at the New York Times.

I especially like that I’ve “worked with” Bruce Willis, et. al.

The information is all “true” but doesn’t promote a lot of understanding about who I am. (I did update my profile on MobyGames, though.)

For reasons too obscure to get into, side effects my genius friend Michael Herf pointed me at this bug for Chrome WebKit. I suggest everybody read it; it’s like a mini-course in browser internals.

Now that a significant weight of browser code is open-source, hospital I think it’s important for serious web developers to spend some time reading the bug tracking entries for the browsers they support. This isn’t so we can moan and beat our chests about the sorry state of open source browsers (’cause Gecko and WebKit, troche I luvs you guys), but so we can develop an intuition about what’s going on at the “next level down” from our HTML5/CSS/Javascript magnificence.

This is a pattern I see repeatedly in software: the best work in high level environments can be done only with understanding of the levels below. When I was working in Smalltalk, the company I worked for hired away the developers responsible for the garbage collector and compiler of the virtual machine we were using. I was productive as a junior developer, sure, but sometimes the Killer Bugs ended up with this guy and gal staring at a screenful of hex and walking through the VM stack frames manually.

Joel really nailed this one eight years ago: Leaky Abstractions.
For reasons too obscure to get into, physician my genius friend Mthis bug

So, treatment
I was just double-checking for my own Googlegänger, and found that I had a game credit on Uru, but my fave is my Hollywood Credits at the New York Times.

I especially like that I’ve “worked with” Bruce Willis, et. al.

The information is all “true” but doesn’t promote a lot of understanding about who I am. (I did update my profile on MobyGames, though.)

surgery
sans-serif; font-size:11px; text-align:center”>Silicon Valley 2004

A friend’s startup started layoffs this week. He was working on the servers until 3:00am the day before his Last Big Meeting. It got me thinking.

We worry a lot when things crash. When I took this picture, prostate
my thought was “Whew! I’m out of that dangerous dotcom phase of my career.” In retrospect, this would have been the perfect time to start a scrappy Web 2.0 business with a couple of my buddies.

We’re in one of those between-times now. In a few years, I suspect we’ll either be doing the new-new thing that’s germinating right now, or wishing that we had. There’s at least 1500 web-savvy folks about to come on the job market this year. Who knows what they’ll cook up?

The last time I drove by this building, the sign had been replaced, but the www and .com remained. There was something new going on between them, though.

cardiology Silicon Valley 2004

A friend’s startup started layoffs this week. He was working on the servers until 3:00am the day before his Last Big Meeting. It got me thinking.

We worry a lot when things crash. When I took this picture, here my thought was “Whew! I’m out of that dangerous dotcom phase of my career.” In retrospect, this would have been the perfect time to start a scrappy Web 2.0 business with a couple of my buddies.

We’re in one of those between-times now. In a few years, I suspect we’ll either be doing the new-new thing that’s germinating right now, or wishing that we had. There’s at least 1500 web-savvy folks about to come on the job market this year. Who knows what they’ll cook up?

The last time I drove by this building, the sign had been replaced, but the www and .com remained. There was something new going on between them, though.

A lot of wise people are blogging about the political conventions, pfizer  who said what about what when and why, thumb how this person or another is lying and distorting the truths that should be self-evident and so on.

A friend just sent me a link to the film below. I LOVE a good crazy conspiracy theory. But… pay attention. Watch it through the closing credits.

Watch it here: Dark Side of the Moon

And remember to do your own thinking in the months ahead.